The National Recording Project for Indigenous Performance in Australia (NRPIPA)

Vision

The NRPIPA was conceived as a key outcome of the first Symposium on Indigenous Music and Dance, which was hosted by the Yothu Yindi Foundation (YYF) during the 2002 Garma Festival in Arnhem Land.

Officially launched by Australian icon Jack Thompson at the 2004 Garma Festival, the vision of the NRPIPA vision is to foster a supportive network of performers, scholars, allied professionals and community stakeholders who are committed to assisting Indigenous Australians to record, document and securely archive their endangered traditions of music and dance, and to apply these unique resources to strategic innovations in business, information technologies, the arts, education, research, governance, health and beyond.

Advances in the accessibility of digital media technologies since the NRPIPA's inception have greatly empowered Indigenous communities to determine how their cherished music and dance traditions are to be recorded, documented and made accessible with respect to international best practices, which are reflected in the NRPIPA's recommended Fieldwork and Archiving Protocols as developed through extensive consultations among performers, scholars, allied professionals and community stakeholders.

The NRPIPA encourages stakeholders engaged in recording, documenting and archiving Australian Indigenous music and dance traditions to obverse our Fieldwork and Archiving Protocols, and invites stakeholders who do so to align their funding applications, collections and publications as relevant with the NRPIPA by name.

The Australian Institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS), Australia's peak body for Indigenous Studies, is the preferred archival repository for all records generated in alignment with the NRPIPA, but are simultaneously deposited in local and regional repositories where possible.

The NRPIPA became a formal Study Group of the MSA in 2017, and since then has incorporated the MSA Indigenous Think Tank, which was formed by the same core group of scholars in 2000.

Mission

The continuing mission of the NRPIPA is outlined in two seminal documents:

The 2002 Garma Statement established the rationale and initial scope for the NRPIPA's formation.

The 2011 ICTM Statement stands as an urgent call for action to support the preservation of Australia's engendered Indigenous music and dance traditions for the benefit of all Australians and cultural diversity worldwide. Founded in 1947, the ICTM is a non-governmental organisation in formal consultative relations with UNESCO and has only once made a formal call of this kind for urgent action.

Symposium

The Symposium on Indigenous Music and Dance is the NRPIPA's annual meeting, and was inaugurated at the 2002 Garma Festival with generous support from AIATSIS.

Each year, this symposium invites proposals for presentations by performers, scholars, allied professionals and/or community stakeholders working in the creation, performance, recording, documentation, archiving and/or exhibition of Indigenous music and dance expressions in Australia and globally.

The 17th Symposium on Indigenous Music and Dance will be convened by Aaron Corn and Clint Bracknell in association with the 41st MSA National Conference in Perth at the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts, Edith Cowan University, on 6-9 December 2018.

Full details of our annual symposiums are:

Year

Venue

Convenor(s)

2018 (17th)

Perth

Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts, Edith Cowan University, in association with the 41st MSA National Conference

Aaron Corn
Clint Bracknell

2017 (16th)

Melbourne

The University of Melbourne in association with the Australian Society of Archivists National Conference and the 2nd Indigenous Technologies and Indigenous Communities Symposium

Aaron Corn

2016 (15th)

Adelaide

National Centre for Aboriginal Language and Music Research, The University of Adelaide, in association with the 39th MSA National Conference

Aaron Corn

2015 (14th)

Cairns

in association with the 4th Indigenous Health Conference

Sally Treloyn

2014 (13th)

Canberra

National Convention Centre in association with the AIATSIS National Indigenous Studies Conference

Aaron Corn

2013 (12th)

Melbourne

The University of Melbourne in association with the Symposium on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Music and Wellbeing

Sally Treloyn

2012 (11th)

Canberra

Manning Clark House in association with the 35th MSA National Conference

Aaron Corn

2011 (10th)

Darwin

North Australia Research Unit, The Australian National University

Allan Marett

2010 (9th)

Canberra

Australian Academy of Science Shine Dome in association with the 1st Indigenous Technologies and Indigenous Communities Symposium

Aaron Corn

2009 (8th)

Darwin

Charles Darwin University in association with the Darwin Festival

Allan Marett
Sally Treloyn

2008 (7th)

Darwin

Charles Darwin University in association with the Darwin Festival

Allan Marett
Sally Treloyn

2007 (6th)

Darwin

North Australia Research Unit, The Australian National University

Allan Marett

2006 (5th)

Gulkula

in association with the YYF Garma Festival in Arnhem Land

Aaron Corn

2005 (4th)

Gulkula

in association with the YYF Garma Festival in Arnhem Land

Allan Marett
Mandawuy Yunupiŋu
Marcia Langton

2004 (3rd)

Gulkula

in association with the YYF Garma Festival in Arnhem Land

Allan Marett
Mandawuy Yunupiŋu
Marcia Langton

2003 (2nd)

Gulkula

in association with the YYF Garma Festival in Arnhem Land

Allan Marett
Mandawuy Yunupiŋu
Marcia Langton

2002 (1st)

Gunyaŋara

Yirrŋa Studio in association with the YYF Garma Festival in Arnhem Land

Allan Marett
Mandawuy Yunupiŋu
Marcia Langton

 

Membership

The NRPIPA welcomes active MSA members representing a broad array of scholarly institutions, professional and community affiliations, and career stages to join this Study Group and share their interests in Indigenous music and dance.

All interested MSA members are invited to participate in the annual Indigenous Think Tank meeting at the MSA National Conference.

The NRPIPA is organised by a Directorate and Steering Committee.

Musicologists Allan Marett and Aaron Corn were respectively the NRPIPA's founding Director and Secretary, while the founding Chairperson of its Steering Committee was the late Mandawuy Yunupiŋu, the original lead singer and composer of the globally-renowned Australian band, Yothu Yindi.

The Directorate of the NRPIPA presently comprises:

  • Aaron Corn, The University of Adelaide (Co-Director)
  • Payi-Linda Ford, Charles Darwin University (Co-Director)
  • Brigitta Scarfe/Anthea Skinner, Monash University (Secretary)

The current members of the NRPIPA Steering Committee are:

  • Clint Bracknell, The University of Sydney
  • Marcia Langton, The University of Melbourne
  • Tom Lawford, Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre
  • David Manmurulu, Warruwi (Co-Chair)
  • Jenny Manmurulu, Warruwi School
  • Allan Marett, The University of Sydney (Co-Chair)
  • Steven Patrick, Tracks Dance Company
  • Sally Treloyn, The University of Melbourne
    • Myfany Turpin, The University of Sydney

Publications

The NRPIPA is affiliated with the Indigenous Music of Australia series of books and annotated recordings published by Sydney University Press.

The many forms of Australia's Indigenous music have ancient roots, huge diversity and global reach.

The Indigenous Music of Australia series aims to stimulate discussion and development of the field of Australian Indigenous music, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander music, in both subject matter and approach.

Proposals are welcomed for studies of traditional and contemporary music and dance, popular music, art music, and experimental and new media, as well as theoretical, analytical, interdisciplinary and practice-based research on relevant themes.

Where relevant, books in this series may be supplemented by web-based and/or audiovisual media publications.

Prospective contributors are invited to discuss potential titles for this series with the Series Editor and/or members of the Editorial Board.

Protocols

In 2005, the NRPIPA conducted two pilot projects funded by the Australian Research Council and the University of Sydney to identify suitable Fieldwork and Archiving Protocols for recording, documenting and archiving Australian Indigenous music and dance expressions under the direction of Indigenous performers and in partnership with community stakeholders.

These protocols were first published in:

The NRPIPA Study Group is presently tasked with reviewing these protocols in consultation with suitably-qualified scholars, allied professionals, community stakeholders, and Indigenous performers.